Academics > Programs List > Automobile Mechanics Technology

Automobile Mechanics Technology

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there is a shortage of about 60,000 automotive technicians nation-wide today. A high-tech career in this field offers mobility and job security.

Ninety five percent of our auto tech graduates are currently working in the field. The average starting wage is $8.50 to $12.50 per hour and average journeyman Automotive Technician wage is about $50,000 to $60,000 per year. Many techs are paid on a commission rate. Opportunities for employment, high wages, and career advancement have never been greater in the automotive field.

The work of automotive service technicians and mechanics has evolved from simply mechanical to high technology. Today integrated electronic systems and complex computers run vehicles and measure their performance while on the road. Automotive service technicians have developed into diagnostic, high-tech problem solvers. 

Technicians must have an increasingly broad base of knowledge about how vehicles' complex components work and interact, as well as the ability to work with electronic diagnostic equipment and computer-based technical reference materials

Automotive service technicians and mechanics use these high-tech skills to inspect, maintain, and repair automobiles and light trucks with gasoline engines. The increasing sophistication of automotive technology now relies on workers who can use computerized shop equipment and work with electronic components, while maintaining their skills with traditional handtools. Because of these changes in the occupation, workers are increasingly called "automotive service technicians," and the title "mechanic" is being used less and less frequently.

The automotive industry has under-gone massive changes in recent years. Computers now control most automotive systems and the aspiring technician is taught to effectively identify, test, and repair these high-tech systems. The influx of technology is what makes an automotive career today more interesting, challenging, and rewarding than ever. 

In the Automotive Technology Certificate and Associate at Applied Science Degree programs at Dodge City Community College, students will gain knowledge in automotive air conditioning, electrical systems, fuel injection, transmissions, and transaxles, engine performance, braking systems, steering and suspension systems, and computerized automotive control systems. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on learning in the labs to develop diagnostic and troubleshooting skills as well as repair procedures.  Graduates of the Automotive Technology Program are typically placed in dealerships, independent garages, and specialty automotive repair facilities. Courses taken for completion of the Certificate Program can be applied towards completion of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Automotive Technology.

College Catalog

This catalog contains the curriculum information a student needs in planning his or her studies at Dodge City Community College.  All students need to become familiar with the language of the college catalog and the necessity of planning a sequence that will provide either a one-year certificate or a two-year degree.  Advisors are provided to assist students in planning their academic program.  As a student, please make sure that you consult your advisor for guidance in planning a program of study.  Students are ultimately responsible for assuring that their academic program meets the requirements for graduation and/or transfer to another degree granting institution.

Contact Information

Jeff Cole
Professor of Automotive Technology
2501 N. 14th Ave.
Dodge City, KS  67801
1-800-367-3222
620-227-9375
jcole@dc3.edu

Stan Sanko
Professor of Automotive Technology
2501 N. 14th Ave.
Dodge City, KS 67801
1-800-367-3222
620-227-9375
sanko@dc3.edu